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Not just the time of the other: what does it mean for Christians today to remember Shabbat and keep it holy? / by Barbara U. Meyer. [Electronic resource]

By: Meyer, Barbara U, 1968-Subject(s): Barth, Karl, 1886-1968 | Sabbath (Jewish law) | Sabbath | Sunday | Christianity and other religions -- JudaismOnline Resources: CLICK HERE FOR ACCESS TO ELECTRONIC COPY OF TEXT In: Religions (ISSN 2077-1444)
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Contents: 1. Introduction.-- 2. When Sunday does not replace the Sabbath.-- 3. Not simply "the time of the other".- 4. Recognizing a sign of the Covenant.-- 5. Karl Barth and the Sabbath.-- 7. Shabbat and post-supersessionist Christian thought.-- 8. To remember Shabbat and keep it holy.-- Notes and references.

In the following, I will use “Sabbath” for the purposes of overall discussion and to review the multi-faceted literature on the topic, and “Shabbat” for the Biblical term and when developing a Christian post-supersessionist approach. I reserve the Hebrew word “Shabbat” for the name of the specific day announced in the Ten Commandments, observed by Jesus and his surroundings and known and practiced up to today by all Jewish denominations in various ways. It is this specific time frame that Christians have direct knowledge of from their Holy Scriptures. In addition, I will use the term “post-supersessionist” to describe an informed and comprehensive approach that rejects any expression of Christianity as replacing, superseding or otherwise disinheriting Judaism. I will use the term “non-supersessionist” for depictions of the Sabbath and Sunday that do not entail thought patterns of replacement but do not include explicit opposition to the idea that a Christian phenomenon—whether in terms of ritual or belief—outdated a Jewish tradition. I argue that in non-supersessionist Christian reasoning, Sunday, however restful, cannot replace the Sabbath observed by Jews. My thesis thus focuses on a distinctly Christian relationship to Shabbat that cannot be transferred to Sunday.

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Item type Current library Call number Status Date due Barcode
Journal article, essay, chapter, etc. Journal article, essay, chapter, etc. Sharing the Word Electronic Library
296.41/MEY (Browse shelf(Opens below)) Available 12613

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03/10/2022

In the following, I will use “Sabbath” for the purposes of overall discussion and to review the multi-faceted literature on the topic, and “Shabbat” for the Biblical term and when developing a Christian post-supersessionist approach. I reserve the Hebrew word “Shabbat” for the name of the specific day announced in the Ten Commandments, observed by Jesus and his surroundings and known and practiced up to today by all Jewish denominations in various ways. It is this specific time frame that Christians have direct knowledge of from their Holy Scriptures. In addition, I will use the term “post-supersessionist” to describe an informed and comprehensive approach that rejects any expression of Christianity as replacing, superseding or otherwise disinheriting Judaism. I will use the term “non-supersessionist” for depictions of the Sabbath and Sunday that do not entail thought patterns of replacement but do not include explicit opposition to the idea that a Christian phenomenon—whether in terms of ritual or belief—outdated a Jewish tradition. I argue that in non-supersessionist Christian reasoning, Sunday, however restful, cannot replace the Sabbath observed by Jews. My thesis thus focuses on a distinctly Christian relationship to Shabbat that cannot be transferred to Sunday.

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